Fielding Graduate University

2020 De la Vina Street
Santa Barbara, California 93105
Admissions: 805-898-4026

Washington DC Offices
700 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE, 2nd Floor
Washington, DC 20003

37th Annual Forensic Psychology Symposium

Hosted by the American College of Forensic Psychology
in collaboration with Fielding Graduate University.

Fielding Graduate University is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Fielding maintains responsibility for this pro-gram and its content. This program will offer a maximum of 22 hours of Continuing Education credits.

The American College of Forensic Psychology certifies that this activity is pending approval for 22 hours of MCLE from the State Bar of California.

Posters

[vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213302179{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column][mepr-show rules="13574" unauth="message"][edgtf_button size="" type="" target="_blank" icon_pack="" font_weight="100" text="VIEW POSTER PDF" link="https://s33847.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Begun-Jacquin-ACFP-2022.pdf"][/mepr-show][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214965136{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_column_text]Authors:  Nancie Begun, M.A., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D. Original Publication Site & Date: American College of Forensic Psychology 2022 Summary:  Although U.S. incarceration rates have decreased overall since 2010 (BJS), incarceration rates for women have increased (Kajstura, 2019). Over-reliance on andro-centric assessments overlook trauma related mental health (e.g., PTSD) and gender specific issues that have the potential to increase effective case planning and reduce recidivism in adult female offenders (Fritzonet al., 2021). Measurements that assess risk factors are used to match offenders with housing and treatment but do not consider trauma-specific pathways to crime (Latessa& Lovins, 2010; Van Voorhiset al., 2010). A closer analysis of...

[vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213302179{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column][mepr-show rules="13574" unauth="message"][edgtf_button size="" type="" target="_blank" icon_pack="" font_weight="100" text="VIEW POSTER PDF" link="https://s33847.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Banks-et-al.-ACFP-2022.pdf"][/mepr-show][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214965136{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_column_text]Authors:   Autumn L. Banks, B.A., LatreaseR. Moore, Ph.D., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D. Original Publication Site & Date: American College of Forensic Psychology 2022 Summary: Over six million adults are supervised by the United States correctional systems, with 1.45 million individuals being detained in prisons (Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2021).  Numerous factors influence criminal attitudes and behaviors throughout life, including maltreatment, previous experiences with the justice system, and intergenerational offending (Davila et al., 2011, Farrington et al., 2009; Farrington, 2010).  [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214003976{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text]Presented by  Autumn L. Banks, B.A., LatreaseR. Moore, Ph.D., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text]Institution School of Psychology Fielding Graduate University [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"] [/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213908314{margin-top: 45px...

[vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213302179{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column][mepr-show rules="13574" unauth="message"][edgtf_button size="" type="" target="_blank" icon_pack="" font_weight="100" text="VIEW POSTER PDF" link="https://s33847.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Ballin-Jacquin-ACFP-2022.pdf"][/mepr-show][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214965136{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_column_text]Authors: Alisha G. Ballin, M.A., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D. Original Publication Site & Date: American College of Forensic Psychology 2022 Summary: •High-profile mass shootings garner significant media and scholarly attention.  ❖Although a definition for mass murder was directed through the Investigative Assistance for Violent Crimes Act of 2012, no federal or legal definition has been established for mass shootings (Booty et al., 2019).  ❖Discrepancies in criteria amongst databases are often derived from the number of victims criteria, with various databases requiring a minimum of zero to four fatalities, as well as location and duration of the attack (Booty et al., 2019). Ambiguity in the definition of...

[vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213302179{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column][mepr-show rules="13574" unauth="message"][edgtf_button size="" type="" target="_blank" icon_pack="" font_weight="100" text="VIEW POSTER PDF" link="https://s33847.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Altomaro-Jacquin-ACFP-2022.pdf"][/mepr-show][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214965136{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_column_text]Authors: Casey J. Altomaro, B.A., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D. Original Publication Site & Date: American College of Forensic Psychology 2022 Summary: • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC; 2013) define adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) as traumatic events endured prior to age 18.  • Children who endure even one ACE are more likely to engagein deviant behaviors later in life (Edalati et al., 2017; Levenson & Socia, 2015; Willis & Levenson, 2016). [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214003976{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text]Presented by  Casey J. Altomaro, B.A., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text]Institution School of Psychology Fielding Graduate University [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"] [/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213908314{margin-top: 45px !important;margin-bottom: 15px !important;}"][/vc_row]  ...

[vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213302179{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column][mepr-show rules="13574" unauth="message"][edgtf_button size="" type="" target="_blank" icon_pack="" font_weight="100" text="VIEW POSTER PDF" link="https://s33847.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Abbie-Hall-et-al-ACFP-2022.pdf"][/mepr-show][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214965136{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_column_text]Authors: Amanda Abbie-Hall, M.A., LaTanya Tolan, M.A., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D. Original Publication Site & Date: American College of Forensic Psychology 2022 Summary: • Federal policies and laws have continuously been known to weaken families, communities, and organizations of Indigenous people (Olson-Pitawanakwat& Baskin, 2020). An example of legislation that is harmful for Indigenous populations is the Indian Act of 1876.  In North America, tribal nations are challenged by a crisis that affects the most vulnerable citizens in their communities, Indigenous women and children.  The movement for Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women (MMIW) addresses violence against Indigenous women as an extension of colonization, discrimination, and historical trauma...