Fielding Graduate University

2020 De la Vina Street
Santa Barbara, California 93105
Admissions: 805-898-4026

Washington DC Offices
700 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE, 2nd Floor
Washington, DC 20003

37th Annual Forensic Psychology Symposium

Hosted by the American College of Forensic Psychology
in collaboration with Fielding Graduate University.

Fielding Graduate University is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Fielding maintains responsibility for this pro-gram and its content. This program will offer a maximum of 22 hours of Continuing Education credits.

The American College of Forensic Psychology certifies that this activity is pending approval for 22 hours of MCLE from the State Bar of California.

Mass Shootings

[vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213302179{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column][mepr-show rules="13574" unauth="message"][edgtf_button size="" type="" target="_blank" icon_pack="" font_weight="100" text="VIEW POSTER PDF" link="https://s33847.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Dismang-Jacquin-ACFP-2022.pdf"][/mepr-show][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214965136{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_column_text]Authors:   Julie N. Dismang, B.S., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D. Original Publication Site & Date: American College of Forensic Psychology 2022 Summary:  Many school shootings can be prevented by recognizing warning signs and knowing the individual (Lankford et al., 2019; Silver et al., 2018b).  In the deadliest shootings, there has been an increase in warning signs and higher likelihood of being reported to law enforcement before the shooting (Lankford et al., 2019).  Policies should be implemented at various levels to identify and intercept potential school shooters before shootings are carried out. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214003976{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text]Presented by  Julie N. Dismang, B.S., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text]Institution School of Psychology Fielding Graduate...

[vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213302179{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column][mepr-show rules="13574" unauth="message"][edgtf_button size="" type="" target="_blank" icon_pack="" font_weight="100" text="VIEW POSTER PDF" link="https://s33847.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Ballin-Jacquin-ACFP-2022.pdf"][/mepr-show][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214965136{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_column_text]Authors: Alisha G. Ballin, M.A., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D. Original Publication Site & Date: American College of Forensic Psychology 2022 Summary: •High-profile mass shootings garner significant media and scholarly attention.  ❖Although a definition for mass murder was directed through the Investigative Assistance for Violent Crimes Act of 2012, no federal or legal definition has been established for mass shootings (Booty et al., 2019).  ❖Discrepancies in criteria amongst databases are often derived from the number of victims criteria, with various databases requiring a minimum of zero to four fatalities, as well as location and duration of the attack (Booty et al., 2019). Ambiguity in the definition of...