Fielding Graduate University

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Santa Barbara, California 93105
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Washington, DC 20003

37th Annual Forensic Psychology Symposium

Hosted by the American College of Forensic Psychology
in collaboration with Fielding Graduate University.

Fielding Graduate University is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. Fielding maintains responsibility for this pro-gram and its content. This program will offer a maximum of 22 hours of Continuing Education credits.

The American College of Forensic Psychology certifies that this activity is pending approval for 22 hours of MCLE from the State Bar of California.

Criminal Attitudes and Behaviors

37th Annual Forensic Psychology Symposium / Criminal Attitudes and Behaviors

[vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213302179{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column][mepr-show rules="13574" unauth="message"][edgtf_button size="" type="" target="_blank" icon_pack="" font_weight="100" text="VIEW POSTER PDF" link="https://s33847.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Woods-et-al.2-ACFP-2022.pdf"][/mepr-show][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214965136{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_column_text]Authors:   Michelle L. Woods, M.S., Stephanie A. Olson, Ph.D., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D.  Original Publication Site & Date: American College of Forensic Psychology 2022 Summary:   Individuals who perform acts of physical aggression are committing crimes and are at risk to acquire criminal charges. Prior research suggests that adults who lack prosocial ways to communicate their emotions use physical aggression as a way to solve problems or express anger (Barratt et al., 1997; Mathias & Stanford, 1999).  Additionally, poor interpersonal skills were found to be consistent with physical and reactive aggression (Hart & Ostrov, 2013).  Physical reactive aggression largely accounts for future violence risk (Matlasz et al., 2020).  There is...

[vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213302179{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column][mepr-show rules="13574" unauth="message"][edgtf_button size="" type="" target="_blank" icon_pack="" font_weight="100" text="VIEW POSTER PDF" link="https://s33847.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Woods-et-al.1-ACFP-2022.pdf"][/mepr-show][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214965136{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_column_text]Authors:   Michelle L. Woods, M.S., Stephanie A. Olson, Ph.D., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D.  Original Publication Site & Date: American College of Forensic Psychology 2022 Summary:  Prior research suggests there is a relationship between psychopathic traits and criminality, including criminal attitudes/thinking (Chu et al., 2014; Mandracchiaet al., 2015), violence (Chu et al., 2014) and other antisocial behavior (Hare, 2003), as well as criminal associates (Chu et al., 2014; Sherrettset al., 2016), and entitlement (Chu et al., 2014).  •However, Boccioand Beaver (2018) found that psychopathic personality traits were only associated with violent behavior, and not associated with peer socialization or criminal attitudes when taking genetics into account.  •There is...

[vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213302179{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column][mepr-show rules="13574" unauth="message"][edgtf_button size="" type="" target="_blank" icon_pack="" font_weight="100" text="VIEW POSTER PDF" link="https://s33847.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Nelson-Jacquin-ACFP-2022.pdf"][/mepr-show][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214965136{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_column_text]Authors:   Madeline Kay Nelson, M.A. & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D. Original Publication Site & Date: American College of Forensic Psychology 2022 Summary:  The Murder Accountability Project is a nonprofit group that makes data available to the general public. These data files accurately account for unsolved homicides within the United States from 1965 to 2017. The collected data is from federal, state, and local governments. From these data files, we have analyzed the associations between the weapons used, months in which *homicides occurred, states in which *homicides occurred, and the number of victims and offenders (i.e., multiple victims and single offender, single victim and multiple offenders). [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214003976{margin-bottom:...

[vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213302179{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column][mepr-show rules="13574" unauth="message"][edgtf_button size="" type="" target="_blank" icon_pack="" font_weight="100" text="VIEW POSTER PDF" link="https://s33847.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Kromer-Jacquin-ACFP-2022.pdf"][/mepr-show][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214965136{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_column_text]Authors:   Lisa R. Kromer & Kristine M. Jacquin Original Publication Site & Date: American College of Forensic Psychology 2022 Summary:   Serial homicides comprise less than 1% of murders in the United States each year, yet an analysis of the antecedents is crucial to preventing these crimes (Federal Bureau of Investigation, 2016; Keatleyet al., 2021). Scientists and investigative units have debated the definition of what it means to be a serial killer.  Adjorloloand Chan (2014) identified three components that describe most serial killers:  Two or more forensically linked murders Themurders are committed by one person The killer’s primary purpose is personal satisfaction  While researchers have defined how to classify a serial killer compared...

[vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213302179{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column][mepr-show rules="13574" unauth="message"][edgtf_button size="" type="" target="_blank" icon_pack="" font_weight="100" text="VIEW POSTER PDF" link="https://s33847.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Banks-et-al.-ACFP-2022.pdf"][/mepr-show][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214965136{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_column_text]Authors:   Autumn L. Banks, B.A., LatreaseR. Moore, Ph.D., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D. Original Publication Site & Date: American College of Forensic Psychology 2022 Summary: Over six million adults are supervised by the United States correctional systems, with 1.45 million individuals being detained in prisons (Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2021).  Numerous factors influence criminal attitudes and behaviors throughout life, including maltreatment, previous experiences with the justice system, and intergenerational offending (Davila et al., 2011, Farrington et al., 2009; Farrington, 2010).  [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214003976{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text]Presented by  Autumn L. Banks, B.A., LatreaseR. Moore, Ph.D., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text]Institution School of Psychology Fielding Graduate University [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"] [/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213908314{margin-top: 45px...

[vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213302179{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column][mepr-show rules="13574" unauth="message"][edgtf_button size="" type="" target="_blank" icon_pack="" font_weight="100" text="VIEW POSTER PDF" link="https://s33847.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2022/04/Altomaro-Jacquin-ACFP-2022.pdf"][/mepr-show][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214965136{margin-bottom: 0px !important;}"][vc_column][vc_column_text]Authors: Casey J. Altomaro, B.A., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D. Original Publication Site & Date: American College of Forensic Psychology 2022 Summary: • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC; 2013) define adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) as traumatic events endured prior to age 18.  • Children who endure even one ACE are more likely to engagein deviant behaviors later in life (Edalati et al., 2017; Levenson & Socia, 2015; Willis & Levenson, 2016). [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=".vc_custom_1591214003976{margin-bottom: 20px !important;}"][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text]Presented by  Casey J. Altomaro, B.A., & Kristine M. Jacquin, Ph.D. [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text]Institution School of Psychology Fielding Graduate University [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/2"] [/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] [/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row content_aligment="center" css=".vc_custom_1591213908314{margin-top: 45px !important;margin-bottom: 15px !important;}"][/vc_row]  ...