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Media Psychology Programs

Fielding’s Media Psychology programs enable students to enter at their qualification, readiness and goal levels. The PhD in Media Psychology program provides a research-based program that informs practice in an evolving field of study. The Masters of Arts in Media Psychology is 100% online, applies psychological science to media and technology landscapes. The 3-course Certificate in Media Psychology program is also 100% online, and offers emphases in Media Neuroscience and Brand Psychology & Audience Engagement.

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Facebook Use, Food Consumption Behavior, and Risk Perception as Predictors of Exposure to Nutrition Misinformation

Authors: Tatyana El-Kour, MA, MS, RDN, FAND, PhD student, School of Psychology. Faculty Advisor: Jerri Lynn Hogg, PhD. Co-Researchers: Jerri Lyn Hogg, Ph.D. and Dan Sewell, Ph.D.

Original Publication Site & Date: Fielding Summer Session July 2019, Chicago, IL

Abstract: Facebook is one of the most popular social media platforms in the world. No research has been done to investigate the phenomenon of Facebook use and nutrition misinformation among Arabs. The study aims to understand whether exposure to nutrition misinformation can be predicted based on Facebook use, food consumption behavior, and risk perception. Specically, the study adopted a cross-sectional web survey of pre-tested 33 questions to which 238 responded. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression to predict exposure to nutrition misinformation from Facebook use, food consumption behavior, and risk perception based on 166 respondents who fully completed the survey. The multiple regression model statistically signicantly predicted exposure to nutrition misinformation, F (3,162) = 41.651, p<0.001, adj. R2= 0.425. All three variables added statistically signicantly to the prediction, p<0.05. Findings support further research and design of interventions addressing determinants of exposure to nutrition misinformation on social media.

When addressing exposure to nutrition misinformation on Facebook, it is important to examine the simultaneous combination of Facebook use, food consumption behavior, and risk perception as multiple factors aecting exposure to nutrition misinformation.

A total of 238 responded to the survey (n=131 English and n=107 Arabic). A difference in the demographic profile was noted between participants who chose to respond to the survey in English over Arabic as shown in Table 1. 51.48% of total respondents identified Google as the first social media channel to go to when seeking nutrition information, followed by YouTube (18.14%), and Facebook (16.45%). See Figure 1. Results of multiple regression model statistically significantly predicted exposure to nutrition misinformation, F (3,162) = 41.651, p<0.001, adj. R2= 0.425. All three variables of Facebook use, food consumption behavior, and risk perception added statistically significantly to the prediction, p<0.05. Regression coefficients and standard errors can be found in Table 2.

Presented by
Tatyana El-Kour, MA, MS, RDN, FAND, PhD student

Institution
Media Psychology, School of Psychology
Fielding Graduate University

Hashtags
#facebook #nutrition #mediapsychology #fielding

 

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